The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
University of Tennessee, Knoxville    
 
    
 
  Sep 24, 2017
 
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Policies and Procedures


Student Rights and Responsibilities
Universal Tracking (uTrack)
Academic Advising at UT
Degree Audit Report System (DARS)
Class Attendance and Eligibility
      --Class Attendance Guidelines for Extenuating Circumstances
      --First Class Meeting
      --Minimum Class Size
Honor Statement
Grade Appeal Procedure
Special State and Federal Laws for Educational Purposes
     --FERPA
      --Social Security Number Use
Other Requirements
Opportunities for High-Achieving Students
     --Advanced Placement Exams
     --International Baccalaureate Exams
     --A-Level and AS-Level Exams
     --Other Exams (CLEP)
     --Honors Programs
     --Dean's List
     --Seniors Eligible for Graduate Credit
General Regulations
    --Student Classification 
    --Transfer Credit
    --Petitioning Process

      --Exploratory Students
      --Writing Competence
Grades, Credit Hours, and Grade Point Average
      --Grade of Incomplete
      --S/NC Grading System
      --ABC/NC Grading System
      --Grade Changes
      --Repeating Courses
Enrollment
      --Term of Enrollment
      --Maximum Hours per Term
      --Prerequisites and Corequisites
      --Adds, Drops, and Withdrawals
      --Total Withdrawal from the University
Academic Standing
      --Good Academic Standing
      --Academic Probation
      --Academic Dismissal
Academic Second Opportunity
Exams
General Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree
      --Multiple Concentrations
      --Second Majors
      --Minors
      --Second Bachelor's Degree
      --Honors Categories for Graduation

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

By registering at the university, the student neither loses the rights nor escapes the duties of a citizen. Enjoying greater opportunities than the average citizen, the university student has greater responsibilities. Each student’s personal life should be conducted in a context of mutual regard for the rights and privileges of others. It is further expected that students will demonstrate respect for the law and for the necessity of orderly conduct in the affairs of the community.

Students are responsible for being fully acquainted with the university catalog, handbook, and other regulations pertaining to students and for complying with them in the interest of an orderly and productive community. The student handbook, Hilltopics, is published and distributed annually and is also available online at the Dean of Students’ website (http://dos.utk.edu/hilltopics) so that students are aware of the university Standards of Conduct and all disciplinary regulations and procedures. Since conduct and actions will be measured on an adult standard, students should understand that they assume full responsibility for the consequences of their actions and behavior. The academic community will be judged in large measure by the actions of its members. Therefore, it is incumbent upon students to include the implications for their community in their criteria for determining appropriate behavior.

The responsibility to secure and to respect general conditions conducive to the freedom to learn is shared by all members of the academic community. This university has a duty to develop policies and procedures that provide a safeguard to this freedom. Such policies and procedures are developed at this institution with the participation of all members of the academic community. As such, the university welcomes and honors people of all races, creeds, cultures, and sexual orientations, and values intellectual curiosity, pursuit of knowledge, and academic freedom and integrity.

Failure or refusal to comply with the rules and policies established by the university may subject the offender to disciplinary action up to and including permanent dismissal from the university.

UNIVERSAL TRACKING (uTrack)

Universal Tracking (uTrack) is an academic monitoring system designed to help students stay on track for timely graduation. uTrack requirements only affect first-time, first-year, full-time, degree-seeking students entering fall 2013.

  1. Students must declare a major or exploratory track at the time they are admitted to the university. Some majors have a competitive admission process.
  2. All first-time, first-year UT Knoxville students must transition out of exploratory tracks into a major no later than the end of the fourth tracking semester at UT Knoxville.
  3. Students who are off track must develop an advisor-approved plan for getting back on track before they will be allowed to register for future tracking semesters.
  4. Students who are off track for two consecutive semesters will be placed on hold and required to select a new major that is better aligned with their abilities.

Exploratory Tracks

  • Students who are deciding among one or more majors that are all offered by the same college follow an exploratory track for that college (e.g., Arts and Sciences Exploratory, Business Exploratory, etc.)
  • Students who have no clear idea of which major to pursue and/or those who are trying to decide among majors that are not in a single college follow the University Exploratory track.

Milestones

  • In order to remain on track for a major or exploratory area, students must complete minimum requirements for each tracking semester known as milestones. Milestones may include successful completion of specified courses and/or attainment of a minimum GPA.

Tracking Semesters

  • Only fall and spring semesters are tracking semesters. Mini and summer semesters are not; they provide an opportunity for students to catch up on unmet milestones. Study abroad and co-op semesters are not tracking semesters. Students participating in study abroad and co-op are not required to complete milestones while they are away from campus.

Tracking Audit

  • Tracking audits help students identify their milestone progress; audits are tied to a catalog year. Tracking audits are used to notify students when they are off track.

Off Track Status

  • Students who are off track at the end of a tracking semester must meet with an advisor as soon as possible, but no later than the end of the next tracking semester to develop a plan for getting back on track. Students who do not have an advisor-approved plan for getting back on track will not be allowed to register for future tracking semesters.
  • Students who are off track for two consecutive semesters will have a hold placed on their registration and must meet with a new advisor in one of the advising centers no later than the end of the “add” period of the next tracking term to select a new major that is better aligned with the student’s abilities.

ACADEMIC ADVISING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

The University of Tennessee recognizes academic advising to be a critical component of the educational experience and student success. Faculty, administrators, and professional staff promote academic advising as a shared responsibility with students. Academic advising serves to develop and enrich students’ educational plans in ways that are consistent with their personal values, goals, and career plans, preparing them for a life of learning in a global society. More information is available at: http://www.utk.edu/advising/.

Students are assigned to advisors based on their major or exploratory track. Advising centers and designated offices in each college advise most freshmen and sophomores. Faculty advisors, working closely with the advising centers, guide most advanced students. At all levels, campus-wide guidelines for good advising are supplemented by specific college standards, guidelines, and evaluation.

Prior to enrolling for the first time at the university, all degree-seeking first-year students and transfer students are required to meet with an academic advisor. Readmitted students must also meet with an academic advisor prior to reenrolling. The following groups of students are required to meet with an advisor during each tracking semester (fall and spring):

  • All students with fewer than 30 hours at UT Knoxville.
  • Students following exploratory tracks.
  • Students identified as “off track” by uTrack.
  • Students on Academic Probation.

All other students are required to consult with an advisor for a substantial conference during a designated semester each year.

  • Students whose ID numbers end in an even digit are required to meet with an advisor during fall semester.
  • Students whose ID numbers end in an odd digit are required to meet with an advisor during spring semester.

All students are encouraged to consult with their advisors at any time.

All students at the University should review carefully the prescribed curricula of the respective degree-granting units and should choose courses in accordance with the exploratory or major track that they are pursuing. More information is available at: http://catalog.utk.edu/. The student, not the advisor, bears the ultimate responsibility for educational planning, selecting courses, meeting course prerequisites, and adhering to policies and procedures. Assistance to students with academic problems or questions is provided by professors, advisors, department heads, and college deans or advising centers. Numerous other sources of academic, career, and personal counseling exist on the UT Knoxville campus and are available to admitted students. These are described in this catalog under Student Affairs and Academic Services and detailed information is available on the Academic Advising website http://www.utk.edu/advising/.

DEGREE AUDIT REPORT SYSTEM (DARS)

DARS provides an automated record of a student’s academic progress toward degree completion in his/her major.

DARS was designed for colleges, deans, advisors, and students to use as an advising tool and to check graduation requirements.

DARS audits for enrolled undergraduate students are available on the web at https://myutk.utk.edu. DARS audits are also available in the advising center and/or the dean’s office of each college and in the Office of the University Registrar, 209 Student Services Building. Students should contact the Office of the University Registrar with any difficulties in accessing Banner DARS.

For questions pertaining to the content of their DARS audit, students should contact their advisor or advising office. Final certification of degree requirements rests with the Office of the University Registrar, 209 Student Services Building.

CLASS ATTENDANCE AND ELIGIBILITY

Only students who are properly registered for a course may attend it on a regular basis. Any other person in the classroom for special reasons must obtain the consent of the instructor.

Academic success is built upon regular class attendance. At the University of Tennessee, students are expected to attend all of their scheduled classes. Research shows a strong correlation between attendance and participation in class and improved student learning. A student who finds it necessary to miss class assumes responsibility for making up examinations, obtaining lecture notes, and otherwise compensating for what may have been missed.

It is the prerogative of the individual instructor to set the attendance requirements for a particular class. This means, for example, that an instructor in first year composition may state in a syllabus how many absences are allowed before a student receives a grade of No Credit.

Class Attendance Guidelines for Extenuating Circumstances

In rare cases, students may have extenuating circumstances that make it impossible for them to attend all sessions of a class. These include military orders, court-imposed legal obligations, religious observances, extended illness, and participation in university, college or unit sponsored activities that lead to clear experiential and educational outcomes. On the first day of class each term, or immediately after the student knows of the need to miss class because of one of these extenuating circumstances, the student should share with the instructor a document detailing the extenuating circumstance. The document should outline the dates on which classes will be missed. Students with documented extenuating circumstances should be allowed to make up missed examinations. Instructors have discretion to determine what course work, beyond examinations, is available for make-up credit. Instructors who feel the required time away from class may be too much to allow a student to do well should consult with the student to determine whether, through extra effort and tutoring, the student may be able to achieve the learning outcomes of the class. If not, the instructor should recommend that the student withdraw from the course. If at all possible, the recommendation to withdraw from the class should occur before the end of the add/drop period. Students should consult with an academic advisor as soon as they know that a class must be dropped.

First Class Meeting

Students who fail to attend the first class or (laboratory) meeting without prior arrangements with the department concerned may lose their space in class to other students. Students should not assume that they will be officially dropped from the class; it is always the responsibility of the student to drop courses not attended. Otherwise, the student is liable for a grade of F in the course and for payment of appropriate fees.

Minimum Class Size

An undergraduate course will not normally be given for fewer than fifteen students at the lower division and twelve at the upper division except by permission of the chancellor. The university reserves the right to cancel, postpone, or combine classes when necessary.

HONOR STATEMENT

All facets of the university community have responsibilities associated with the Honor Statement. These responsibilities are unique to each sector of the university community.

Each student is responsible for his/her own personal integrity in academic life. While there is no affirmative duty to report the academic dishonesty of another, each student, given the dictates of his/her own conscience, may choose to act on any violation of the Honor Statement. Each student is responsible for knowing the terms and conditions of the Honor Statement and may acknowledge his/her adherence to the Honor Statement by writing “Pledged” and signing each graded class assignment and examination.

Students are also responsible for any acts of plagiarism. Plagiarism is using the intellectual property of someone else without giving proper credit. The undocumented use of someone else’s words or ideas in any medium of communication (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge) is a serious offense, subject to disciplinary action that may include failure in a course and/or dismissal from the university. 

Specific examples of plagiarism are

  • Copying without proper documentation (quotation marks and a citation) written or spoken words, phrases, or sentences from any source.
  • Summarizing without proper documentation (usually a citation) ideas from another source (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge).
  • Borrowing facts, statistics, graphs, pictorial representations, or phrases without acknowledging the source (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge).
  • Collaborating on a graded assignment without instructor’s approval.
  • Submitting work, either in whole or part, created by a professional service and used without attribution (e.g., paper, speech, bibliography, or photograph).

Faculty members also have responsibilities which are vital to the success of the Honor Statement and the creation of a climate of academic integrity within the university community. Each faculty member is responsible for defining, in specific terms, guidelines for preserving academic integrity in a course. Included in this definition should be a discussion of the Honor Statement. Faculty members at their discretion may also encourage their students to acknowledge adherence to the Honor Statement by “pledging” all graded class assignments and exams. The form of pledge may include writing the honor statement on the assignment, signing the printed statement, or simply writing “Pledged.”

Additionally, it will be the responsibility of each faculty member, graduate teaching assistant, and staff member to act on any violation of the Honor Statement. It is also incumbent upon faculty to maintain an atmosphere conducive to academic integrity by insuring that each quiz, test, and exam is adequately proctored.

The Statement

An essential feature of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is a commitment to maintaining an atmosphere of intellectual integrity and academic honesty. As a student of the university, I pledge that I will neither knowingly give nor receive any inappropriate assistance in academic work, thus affirming my own personal commitment to honor and integrity.

GRADE APPEAL PROCEDURE

Appeals to the Undergraduate Council

The Undergraduate Council hears appeals concerning grades only after grievances have been duly processed, without resolution, through appropriate procedures at the department and college levels (See Appeals Procedure outlined below). The council does not review grievances concerning allegations of misconduct or academic dishonesty. Procedures for consideration of such matters are published in Hilltopics under “Student Rights and Responsibilities.” Students should begin the appeal process as soon as possible. No appeal may be filed later than 90 days after the final grade has been issued.

Grounds for Appeal

Students may appeal grades on the basis of one or more of four allowable grounds.

  1. A clearly unfair decision (such as lack of consideration of circumstances clearly beyond the control of the student, e.g., a death in the family, illness or accident).
  2. Unacceptable instruction/evaluation procedures (such as deviation from stated policies on grading criteria, incompletes, late paper, examinations, or class attendance).
  3. Inability of instructor to deal with course responsibilities.
  4. An exam setting which makes concentration extremely difficult.

The Appeals Procedure

Instructor Level

The student should first consult with the instructor and if agreement cannot be reached, the student may appeal to the department head. If the student believes the grade assignment was based on criteria other than academic, such as race, gender, religious beliefs, national origin, age or handicap, then the student should make an appeal in writing to the Office of Equity and Diversity with a copy to the department head.

Departmental Level

If the student appeals to the department head after attempts to resolve the matter with the instructor have failed, it is the responsibility of the department head to determine the circumstances surrounding the assignment of the grade.

If the department head has reason to believe that none of the four academic conditions specified above apply, then the department head should encourage the student to accept the assigned grade. If the student wishes to pursue the appeal further, he or she may appeal in writing to the dean of the college in which the department is located.

If the department head has reason to believe that any of the four conditions do apply, then the instructor should be encouraged by the department head to reconsider the grade. If the instructor elects not to change the grade, then the department head will appoint a committee of at least three faculty members to review the matter. Such committee will be charged with making a timely recommendation to the department head concerning the student’s grade. The student must submit a written appeal for the committee’s consideration or for any appeal made beyond the departmental level. If the departmental committee’s recommendation is that the student’s grade should be higher than the one assigned and the instructor still elects not to assign the recommended higher grade, the department head will assign the grade of pass, or, at the student’s option, he/she may accept the existing grade. In such a case, all other restrictions to use of the grade to satisfy graduation requirements are waived. If the departmental committee’s recommendation is that the student’s grade should not be higher than the one assigned, the department head will inform the student that the appeal has been denied.

College Level

If the student wishes to pursue the appeal further, he or she may appeal in writing to the dean of the college in which the department is located. It is the responsibility of the dean to determine the circumstances surrounding the assignment of the grade. After reviewing the appeal, the dean may grant the appeal, deny the appeal, or appoint a committee to review the appeal similar to the process outlined on the departmental level. If the Dean grants the appeal, a grade of pass will be assigned, or, at the student’s option, he/she may accept the existing grade. In such a case, all other restrictions to use of the grade of pass to satisfy graduation requirements are waived. If the Dean determines that the student’s grade should not be higher than the one assigned, the Dean will inform the student that the appeal has been denied.

Undergraduate Council Level

The student may forward to the Assistant Provost for Student Success and the Chair of the Undergraduate Council a statement requesting a review of the student’s complaint concerning his or her grade. The appeal must be written and must be based upon one or more of the four allowable grounds, explaining in detail why the appeal is based upon these grounds. No appeals will be accepted via fax or e-mail. The appeal must be sent via mail or hand delivered and include a signature. Appeals can be mailed to the Assistant Provost for Student Success, 1817 Melrose Ave., University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-3707.

The Assistant Provost for Student Success, after consulting with the student and the college office to determine that the appeal does in fact fall under the jurisdiction of the Undergraduate Council and has been brought forward in the proper form, will, first, forward the appeal to the Appeals Committee of the Undergraduate Council for review and, second, notify the dean, the department head, the course instructor, and the student that the Appeals Committee has the case under review. Upon receipt of the appeal, the chairperson of the Appeals Committee will call a special meeting of the committee for purposes of hearing the appeal. The chair will invite the student, the instructor, and the department head to appear in person if they choose or to supply a written statement (in the student’s case this statement will already have been provided). The committee will maintain minutes of the hearing. After hearing the appeal, the Appeals Committee will vote as to whether the grade should be overturned. A majority vote will constitute the decision of the committee. A tie vote will be decided by the chair. The decision of the Appeals Committee will be relayed by the chair of the committee in writing to the principals.

If the appeal has been denied by the Appeals Committee, the student may appeal to the full Undergraduate Council. If the council denies the appeal, the grade stands. 

If the student’s appeal is upheld by the Appeals Committee, the instructor may appeal to the full Undergraduate Council. If the council holds for the instructor, the grade stands. If the student’s appeal is upheld by the Appeals Committee and there is no appeal by the instructor to the full Undergraduate Council, or if the instructor does appeal to the full Undergraduate Council and the council holds for the student, the instructor may either elect to change the grade to a higher grade or refuse to do so. If the instructor refuses to change the grade, the chancellor will instruct the university registrar to change the course grade to Pass.

In all cases of appeal to the full Undergraduate Council, the chairperson of the Undergraduate Council will notify the student or instructor, in writing, of the council’s decision and if applicable, of the right to further appeal in accordance with Article 5, Section 7, of the University Bylaws: Officers, faculty and staff members, students, employees, alumni, and all other officers who feel that they may have a grievance against the university shall have the right of appeal through the chancellor or vice-president to the president of the university.

An appeal to the chancellor must be filed within 60 days of the Undergraduate Council decision.

SPECIAL STATE AND FEDERAL LAWS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES

American History

Effective July 1, 1978 and afterwards, all students receiving a bachelor’s degree must have completed one unit of American history on the high school level or 6 semester hours of collegiate American history as required by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee (Tennessee Code Annotated Section 493253).

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

This act, also known as the Buckley Amendment, gives four basic rights to students.

  • The right to review their education records.
  • The right to seek to amend their education records.
  • The right to limit disclosure of personally identifiable information (directory information).
  • The right to notify the Department of Education concerning an academic institution’s failure to comply with FERPA regulations.

FERPA provides for confidentiality of student records; however, it also provides for basic identification of people at the University of Tennessee without the consent of the individual. Release of information to third parties includes directory information, such as contained in the campus telephone book, in the online web-based people directory, and in sports brochures. Directory information includes, but is not limited to, student name, local and permanent address, Net ID, university e-mail address, telephone number, classification, graduate or undergraduate levels, full time or part-time status, college, major, dates of attendance, degrees and awards, the most recent previously attended educational institution, participation in school activities and sports, and height and weight (for special activities). Students are notified of their FERPA rights and the procedures for limiting disclosure of directory information in Hilltopics, at Orientation for new students, and on the website of the University Registrar http://ferpa.utk.edu/.

Social Security Number Use

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, requires the assignment of a unique student number for internal identification of each student’s record. In December 2004, the university began assigning individual student identification numbers to newly admitted students. Students will no longer use their SSNs to conduct business or access their records.

Student identification numbers are used for university business only. The university complies with FERPA guidelines when releasing student identification numbers.

Students requiring a correction or change to their student identification numbers or to their Social Security Numbers should contact Student Data Resources at (865) 974-2108.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Program Assessment and Improvement Through Student Evaluation

In order for the university to assess and improve its academic programs, periodic measurements of student perceptions and intellectual growth must be obtained. Students could therefore be asked to participate in one or more evaluative procedures which may include broad surveys of engagement or satisfaction, examinations in general education or assessments of their major field of study. The evaluative information obtained through this process is used to improve the quality of the educational experience for current as well as future students.

Senior General Education Test

The Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) requires that each public institution for higher learning evaluate the general education skills of the senior class. Each year a percentage of the seniors are selected to participate in the assessment. The results enable the University of Tennessee to evaluate its general education program and to qualify for needed funding from the state. Students are informed in their senior year if they have been selected to participate.

Senior Major Field Assessment Test

THEC also requires that each public institution for higher learning evaluate the knowledge and expertise obtained within each major area of study. Each year, a subset of all departments on campus is required to assess all graduating seniors from those respective areas. The results enable the University of Tennessee to evaluate and, where necessary, improve the quality of major fields of study. Students are informed in their senior year if they have been selected to participate.

Special Requirements for Student-Athletes

Student-athletes participating in intercollegiate athletics under the provisions of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Southeastern Conference (SEC) must fulfill NCAA academic progress requirements in addition to the university’s academic continuation and retention policies. In addition to meeting with college-specific academic advisors, student-athletes work with academic counselors in the Thornton Athletics Student Life Center to ensure adherence to university, SEC and NCAA academic policies and requirements.

Teacher Licensure

Though faculty members of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences take major responsibility for teaching students how to teach (i.e., pedagogy), other faculty throughout the campus teach students what to teach (i.e., subject matter). For example, the faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences has responsibility for providing the broad, general education background required of all teachers and for providing the specialized content knowledge needed by elementary and secondary teachers.

Information regarding other teaching fields and educational specialties is available through the following campus offices.

  • Agriculture Education – 325 Morgan Hall
  • Art Education – 1715 Volunteer Boulevard, 213 Art and Architecture Building
  • Music Education – 1741 Volunteer Boulevard, 211A Music Building
  • School Counseling – A535 Jane and David Bailey Education Complex
  • School Psychology – A535 Jane and David Bailey Education Complex
  • Speech and Hearing Education – 578 South Stadium Hall
  • Social Work – 308 Henson Hall
  • VolsTeach – 101 Greve Hall

Information regarding general teacher preparation is described in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences section of this catalog and is available through the college’s Licensure Services, A313 Claxton Complex.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR HIGH-ACHIEVING STUDENTS

Advanced Placement Examinations

Freshmen admitted to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, may receive credit on the basis of performance on one or more of the Advanced Placement Examinations offered each May by the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) in 18 subject areas. The tests are usually taken by high school students during their junior or senior year.

Disciplines at UT Knoxville which grant advanced placement credit for satisfactory test scores include biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, English, French, geography, geology, German, history, Latin, mathematics, music, physics, political science, psychology, Spanish, and statistics. Each participating department decides the acceptable score for credit. Information may be obtained from http://admissions.utk.edu/undergraduate/apply/apcredit.shtml or from Arts and Sciences Advising Services.

International Baccalaureate Examinations

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) is a rigorous pre-university course of studies that leads to examinations for highly motivated secondary school students.

Students who have participated in the International Baccalaureate Program through their high schools may receive credit based on satisfactory test scores as established by UT Knoxville’s participating departments. Each participating department decides the acceptable score for credit. Information may be obtained from http://admissions.utk.edu/undergraduate/apply/apcredit.shtml or from Arts and Sciences Advising Services.

A-Level and AS-Level Examinations

Students admitted to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, may receive credit on the basis of performance on one or more of these examinations. Several disciplines at UT Knoxville grant academic credit for satisfactory test scores. Each participating department decides the acceptable score for credit. More information may be obtained from http://admissions.utk.edu/undergraduate/apply/apcredit.shtml or from Arts and Sciences Advising Services.

Proficiency and Other Examinations

With departmental approval, nationally recognized examinations, such as the examinations of the College Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board, may be used to earn credit.

Students who want to use proficiency or other examinations to earn credit for work or material mastered through non-credit courses or experiences should contact the dean of the college that offers the course for which credit is sought.

Honors Programs at the University of Tennessee

Several honors options are available. The Chancellor’s Honors Program is available to entering first-year students, current first- and second-year students, and qualified transfer students. For a description of this program please see Chancellor’s Honors.

Most colleges have college-wide honors programs.

Many academic departments have honors programs. All of these programs require that at least 12 hours of honors courses be used in satisfaction of degree requirements though some departments may require more. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.25 and a senior research project or thesis are required for award of the honors degree. For specific requirements see individual program degree requirements.

Courses designated as honors courses are available to all students with requisite ACT/SAT scores and previous acceptable academic performance. Please see specific course descriptions for registration requirements.

Chancellor’s Honors students, College Scholars, and students participating in a departmental or college-level honors program at UT Knoxville are eligible to complete upper-division courses as Honors-by-Contract, which is a customized approach requiring completion of a written contract delineating additional effort. See http://honors.utk.edu/ for details on the contract.

Dean’s List

A public announcement is made of students passing a semester’s work summa cum laude (3.8 through 4.0), magna cum laude (3.65 through 3.79), and cum laude (3.5 through 3.64). To be eligible, students must complete at least 12 hours, not counting work taken on a Satisfactory/No Credit basis.

Seniors Eligible for Graduate Credit

Subject to approval by the Dean of the Graduate School, a senior at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, who needs fewer than 30 semester hours to complete requirements for a bachelor’s degree and has at least a B average (3.0) may enroll in graduate courses for graduate credit, provided the combined total of undergraduate and graduate course work does not exceed 15 credit hours per semester.

  • Only students working toward a first bachelor’s degree are eligible.
  • Students who have met all requirements for graduation are not eligible.
  • Approval must be obtained each semester at the Graduate School, 111 Student Services Building; (865) 974-8728. Form available online at http://gradschool.utk.edu
  • A maximum of 9 hours of graduate credit at the 400- and 500-level can be obtained in this status.
  • Some departments do not permit seniors to register for graduate courses without prior permission.
  • Courses taken for graduate credit may not be used for both the baccalaureate and a graduate degree program except in the case of approved dual bachelor’s/master’s programs.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

Classification

Undergraduate students are classified according to the following chart on the basis of semester hours passed.

To be considered a full-time undergraduate student in any semester, a student must be enrolled in 12 semester hours, including the full summer term. Six hours for each separate term of the summer session are required for full-time classification. Audit hours are not considered in the computation.

             Classification of Undergraduate Students by Semester Hours Passed

All Programs except Architecture
      
 

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

  Architecture
Year
Hours Year Hours
Freshman 0-29.9 Freshman 0-31.9
Sophomore 30-59.9 Sophomore 32-63.9
Junior 60-89.9 Junior 64-95.9
Senior 90-up Senior 96-127.9
Fifth Year Senior -- -- Fifth Year Senior 128-up

Course Numbers and Levels 

Each course offered by the university is identified by the name of the academic discipline and a three-digit course number. These numbers indicate course level.

Course Numbers Level
000-099 Noncredit; preparatory.
100-299 Lower division; primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
300-499 Upper division; primarily for juniors and seniors; when taken for graduate credit, the letter G will precede the course credit hours on the grade report.
500-599 Graduate; sometimes available for undergraduate credit; when taken for undergraduate credit, the letter U will precede the course credit hours on the grade report.
600-699 Advanced graduate; open to graduate students; available for undergraduate credit (with approval of instructor) for students holding a degree who are taking additional work as undergraduate non-degree students; when taken for undergraduate credit, the letter U will precede the course credit hours on the grade report.
800-899 Veterinary Medicine; Law.
900-999 Law.
   

Transfer Credit

Course transfer may be accepted from any two- or four-year accredited college, normally institutions with regional accreditation in the United States. Students from non-United States colleges or universities should consult the transfer evaluators in the Office of the University Registrar for transfer eligibility.

More detailed information is available in the Admission to the University  section of this catalog.

Transfer Credit: Study Abroad Programs

Students who participate in UT Knoxville study abroad programs and register for UT Knoxville courses earn the same graded credit as they would for courses taken on campus. All grades are calculated in the UT grade point average.

Students who participate in all other study abroad programs from accredited institutions will be subject to the same transfer policies as students studying at domestic institutions. All hours and grades count toward the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS) but are not calculated in the UT grade point average.

Petitioning Process

The university offers a petitioning procedure through which students can occasionally gain exceptions to the general rules included in this catalog. It is the direct responsibility of the student who seeks to deviate from the rules to complete the petitioning process. In cases where this might affect the student’s eligibility to enroll in a particular course, the student should begin the petitioning process during the previous term and must gain final approval for the petition no later than the add deadline of the term involved.

The steps involved in this process are as follows.

Curricular, Major, Minor and/or Graduation Requirements

  • The student completes the petition with the assistance of his/her advisor and obtains the signatures of the advisor and department head or curricular chair.
  • The department sends the petition to the college’s advising center or dean’s office for consideration.
  • If the petition is approved, it is entered into DARS (Degree Audit Report System) by the college staff.

University General Education Requirement

  • The student completes the petition with the assistance of his/her advisor and obtains the signatures of the advisor.
  • The student takes the signed petition to the student’s college advising office.
  • The college sends the petition to the General Education Committee designee for consideration.
  • If the petition is approved, it is entered into DARS (Degree Audit Report System) by the college staff.

Exploratory Students

Many students are undecided about their major when they enter the University of Tennessee. Students who have no clear idea of which college or major to pursue and/or those who are trying to decide among majors that are not in a single college are designated as University Exploratory. Students who are deciding among one or more majors that are all offered by the same college are designated as exploratory students for that college (e.g., Arts and Sciences Exploratory, Business Exploratory, etc.).

Exploratory students follow a track of courses that will allow them to explore major options as well as make progress toward graduation through the completion of general education courses.

All first-time, first-year UT Knoxville students must transition out of the exploratory track into a major no later than the end of their fourth tracking semester at the University of Tennessee. Transfer students with less than 45 hours of transferrable work who are admitted as exploratory students must transition out of the exploratory track into a major no later than the end of their second tracking semester. Transfer students with 45 hours or more of transferrable work must be admitted directly into a major and college.

Writing Competence

The faculty of all colleges expect students to communicate effectively in standard written English in laboratory reports, examinations, essays, and other written assignments. If a student cannot fulfill the requirements for a course because of an inability to communicate in writing, the instructor will give the student an IW to designate “incomplete due to writing.” Any student who receives an IW should contact the Writing Center director (212 Humanities and Social Sciences Building).

  • The instructor of the course determines the appropriate requirement for remediation and sends any student work requiring revision to the Writing Center director.
  • The Writing Center director determines when the requirement has been fulfilled. Upon the Writing Center director’s recommendation, the student’s work is returned to the instructor, who will change the student’s grade accordingly.
  • As with other incompletes, the student will have one calendar year to make up the deficiency before the grade automatically changes to reflect failure for the course.

GRADES, CREDIT HOURS, AND GRADE POINT AVERAGE

The unit of credit is the semester credit hour. One semester credit hour represents an amount of instruction that reasonably approximates both 50 minutes per week of classroom-based direct instruction and a minimum of two hours per week of student work outside the classroom over a fall or spring semester. Normally, each semester credit hour represents an amount of instruction that is equivalent to 700 minutes of classroom-based direct instruction. The amount of time that is required to earn one semester credit hour in a laboratory, fieldwork, studio, or seminar-based course varies with the nature of the subject and the aims of the course; typically, a minimum of two or three hours of work in a laboratory, field, studio, or seminar-based setting is considered the equivalent of 50 minutes of classroom-based direct instruction. Semester credit hours earned in courses such as internships, research, theses, dissertation, etc. are based on outcome expectations established by the academic program.

Each course at the university carries a number of credit hours specified in the  course description. At the completion of each course, a student will be assigned a grade reflecting the student’s performance in the course. Passing grades carry a certain number of quality points per credit hour in the course. A student’s grade point average is obtained by dividing the number of quality points the student has accumulated at UT Knoxville by the number of hours the student has attempted at UT Knoxville, not including hours for which grades of I, N, NC, NR, P, S, and W have been received.

Undergraduate Grades

 
Grade Performance Level Quality Points Per Semester Hours of Credit
A Superior 4.0
A- Intermediate Grade 3.7
B+ Very Good 3.3
B Good 3.0
B- Intermediate Grade 2.7
C+ Fair 2.3
C Satisfactory 2.0
C- Unsatisfactory 1.7
D+ Unsatisfactory 1.3
D Unsatisfactory 1.0
D- Unsatisfactory .7
F Failure 0.0

First Year Composition

ENGL 101 *, ENGL 102 *, ENGL 118 *, ENGL 131 *, and ENGL 132 * are offered on a system of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, I, NC, W grading. All entering freshman, except international students, must enroll in ENGL 101 *, ENGL 102 * or ENGL 118 *.

Grade of Incomplete

Under extraordinary circumstances and at the discretion of the instructor, the grade of I (Incomplete) may be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed a substantial portion of the course but cannot complete the course for reasons beyond their control.

  • The I grade is not issued in lieu of the grade F.
  • The terms for the removal of the I, including the time limit for removal of the I, is decided by the instructor.
  • It is the responsibility of the student receiving an I to arrange with the instructor whatever action is needed to remove the grade at the earliest possible date, and in any event, within one calendar year of the assignment of incomplete.
  • Students may not remove an I grade by re-enrolling in the course.
  • The I grade does not carry quality points and is not computed as a grade of F in the grade point average.
  • If the I grade is not removed within one calendar year or upon graduation, it shall be changed to an F and count as a failure in the computation of the grade point average.
  • A student need not be enrolled at the university to remove a grade of incomplete.
  • In addition, a grade of IW may be assigned if a student cannot fulfill the requirements for a course because of an inability to communicate in writing. (See Writing Competence for more information about the IW grade.)

Grades that do not Influence Grade Point Average

The following grades carry no quality points and hours for which these grades are earned are not counted in computing a student’s grade point average.

  • NC (No Credit) indicates failure to complete a course satisfactorily when taken on an S/NC basis.
  • S (Satisfactory) is assigned for C or better work when a course is taken on an S/NC grading basis.
  • W (Withdrawal) is assigned in courses when a student has officially withdrawn from the university. W is also assigned in courses when a student withdraws from a course between the 11th and 84th calendar day of classes. Regulation concerning withdrawal from courses or from the university appear under Adds, Drops and Withdrawals.

Satisfactory/No Credit Grading System

The purpose of this system is to encourage the student to venture beyond the limits of those courses in which the student usually does well and, motivated by intellectual curiosity, explore subject matter in which performance may be somewhat less outstanding than work in other subjects. To this end, Satisfactory/No Credit (S/NC) grading has been developed for undergraduate courses (100-, 200-, 300-, and 400-level courses).

  • Neither grade is counted in a student’s grade point average, but, like all other grades, is entered on the permanent record.
  • S is given for C or better work on the traditional grading scale and NC is given for grades of C-, D+, D, D-, and F.
  • The student only receives credit in the course if an S is received.
  • A student may not repeat a course for S/NC if the student received a conventional grade (A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, and F).
  • If the student elects non-conventional grading, grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C will be recorded on the student’s permanent academic record as S, and C-, D+, D, D- or F as NC.
  • The grade of I for incomplete work will be recorded as an SI, which will not be computed in the average.
  • A student is permitted to change the system of grading in a course through the add deadline.
  • The changing of an S/NC grade to a conventional letter grade or vice versa is not permitted unless an error is determined by the Office of the University Registrar.

ABC/No Credit Grading System

ABC/NC grading is an alternative to the standard grading system (A-F). Freshmen composition and some 100-level mathematics and science courses use this grading method. Courses offered only on an ABC/NC basis are identified in the course descriptions.

  • All grades are entered on the permanent record.
  • A grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, or C is equivalent to the same grade used in the standard grading system.

  • A grade of NC signifies a standard grade of C-, D+, D, D- or F.

  • A-C grades are included in the calculation of the grade point average, but NC grades are not included.

Transfer students are held to the same program requirements and policies as UT Knoxville students. For ABC/NC graded coursework, only those courses in which at least a grade of C was earned will be eligible to meet program requirements.

Grade Changes for Undergraduate Students

A change of the final course grade may occur in cases of arithmetical or clerical error, removal of a grade of Incomplete, or as the result of a successful grade appeal (as outlined in the “Grade Appeal Procedure” section). An  undergraduate student may not submit additional work, rewrite an assignment, nor repeat an examination to raise a final grade.

Repeating Courses

General Repeat Policy

Students who are struggling with a class should talk with their advisor before deciding whether to withdraw from and/or plan to repeat a class.

  • Courses may be repeated twice, for a total of three attempts per course.
  • A grade of W does not count as one of the three attempts.
  • Grades of C-, D+, D, D-, F, Incomplete, and NC are counted as one of the three attempts.
  • No course may be repeated if a grade of C or better has already been earned.
  • Each repeated course is counted only once in determining credit hours presented for graduation.
  • With limited exceptions (see Grade Replacement Policy), all grades earned in repeated courses will count in calculating the GPA.
  • Exceptions to the number of times a course may be repeated will be allowed only with prior written permission from the head of the department where the course is being offered and the student’s college dean or designee.

Grade Replacement Policy for Three Lower Division (100-200 Level) Courses

  • The first three lower-division (100-200 level) course grades may be replaced when a course is repeated. All other grades will be included in computing the cumulative grade point average.
  • If the same course is repeated more than once, the additional repeat(s) will count toward the grade replacement total.
  • Repeating a course in which an NC or a W grade has been earned does not count as one of the three grade replacements.
  • The grade earned during the final attempt will be used in computing the cumulative GPA.
  • All grades for all courses remain on the transcript.
  • Transfer course grades cannot be replaced (see Transfer Admission policy).

ENROLLMENT

Term of Enrollment

Students must be enrolled in a course during the term in which the coursework is initiated.

Maximum Hours per Term

Undergraduate students may enroll for a maximum of 19 credit hours each semester. Enrollment in more than 19 hours must be approved by the dean of the student’s college or school.

Maximum Hours for Mini Session

Undergraduate students may enroll in one course during mini session which is part of summer term. Enrollment that exceeds the maximum must be approved by the dean of the student’s college.

Maximum Hours for Summer Term

Undergraduate students may enroll for a maximum of 6 credit hours for each of the first and second sessions. Students may enroll for a maximum of 12 credit hours for those courses that extend through the entire session. Students may enroll for a maximum of 12 credit hours in any combination of summer session courses. Enrollment that exceeds the maximum must be approved by the dean of the student’s college.

Auditing Courses

Students may enter classes as auditors with the consent of the instructor. The instructor will determine the appropriate requirements or restrictions. Auditors receive no credit and the audited course will not be recorded on the transcript. The student’s name will appear on the class roll to inform the instructor that the student is properly enrolled as auditor.

Auditors are required to register and pay fees. Prior to the add deadline, a change from credit to audit or from audit to credit must be made by completing the change of credit portion of the Add Course (Change of Registration) form and having it processed in 209 Student Services Building. Once the drop deadline is passed, a change will not be allowed.

Prerequisite and Corequisite Courses

Students must meet prerequisite and corequisite requirements for all courses with such restrictions, and no student shall be permitted to register for those courses in which the requirements have not been met.

Adds, Drops, and Withdrawals

Undergraduate students may add courses through the tenth calendar day counted from the beginning of classes fall and spring terms1. Because of the nature of some courses, permission of the department head may be required to add a course after classes begin. Students may also, as departmental policies permit, change a section of a course through the add deadline.

Students may drop courses until the 10th calendar day from the start of classes with no notation on the academic record for full term courses in fall and spring.

From the 11th day until the 84th calendar day, students may drop courses and will receive the notation of W (Withdrawn) for full term courses in fall and spring. Following are additional regulations related to dropping classes after the 10th day:

  • Students are allowed four drops during their academic career (until a bachelor’s degree is earned).
  • Students holding a bachelor’s degree who return to pursue a second bachelor’s degree are allowed four additional drops.
  • Students pursuing more than one major or degree simultaneously are not allowed additional drops beyond the four available drops.
  • After the 84th day, no drops are permitted.  From the 85th day to the last day of classes, students still have the option of withdrawing from the university (dropping all courses).
  • Withdrawing from the university (dropping all courses) does not impact a student’s four allotted drops. More information on withdrawals is provided in the catalog section, Withdrawing from the University.
  • The W grade is not computed in the grade point average.
  • Courses may be dropped on the web (https://myutk.utk.edu/).

Failure to attend a course is not an official withdrawal and will result in the assignment of an F grade.

1 The periods for add, drop, change of grading for sessions within the full term, summer, and mini term are determined based on a percentage of the equivalent deadline   for the full term. See Timetable of Classes each term for exact dates on the MyUTK website at https://myutk.utk.edu/. Deadline dates may be adjusted if the deadline falls on a holiday, weekend day or spring recess.

Total Withdrawal from the University

Undergraduate students who need to drop all of their courses and leave the university before a term is finished may withdraw by the deadline on the web (www.myutk.utk.edu/). The word “withdrawn” will be posted on the transcript.

  • Three total withdrawals from the university are allowed. Fall and spring semesters are included in the three total withdrawals; mini and summer terms are not counted.
  • After three total withdrawals from the university, a student must sit out for both a fall and spring semester. After sitting out a student may apply for readmission. If readmission is granted, no additional total withdrawals will be allowed and earned grades will stand for all future terms.
  • A total withdrawal from the university does not impact a student’s four allotted “course drops with a W” over his/her undergraduate career. More information on dropping a single course with a W is provided in the catalog section, Adds, Drops, and Withdrawals.
  • It is the responsibility of a student who has registered for classes to attend them or, if that is impossible, to apply for a total withdrawal from the university. A student will receive final grades unless the student follows procedures for a total withdrawal from the university.
  • A student who simply stops participating in classes, or fails to attend class, without officially withdrawing from the university will be assigned the grade of F in each course (or NC for S/NC graded coursework).
  • Students who do officially totally withdraw from the university must apply for readmission in advance of their next term of anticipated enrollment, except for withdrawal from mini and summer terms.
  • Enrolled students are liable for payment of fees. Any refunds that may be due upon a student’s total withdrawal from the university are issued by the Office of the Bursar, 211 Student Services Building.
  • Students who are called to active military duty during a term of enrollment should contact the Office of the University Registrar for assistance with total withdrawal from the university and readmission procedures.

Extracurricular Participation

Students who are enrolled or eligible to enroll at the university may participate in extracurricular activities as permitted by the individual club or organization.

ACADEMIC STANDING

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, expects all students who enroll to make progress toward graduation. To graduate from UT Knoxville, a student must earn a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0. The university reviews students’ academic records at the end of each term to determine academic standing. The catalog contains additional requirements for specific programs.

Good Academic Standing

A student is in good academic standing when both the student’s term and cumulative GPAs are 2.0 or higher or, if after two consecutive terms, the student’s cumulative GPA is 2.0 or higher and at least one term GPA is also 2.0 or higher. 

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on Academic Probation when (1) his/her cumulative GPA falls below the minimum acceptable level of 2.0 for one semester or (2) the semester GPA falls below the minimum acceptable level of 2.0 two consecutive terms of enrollment. During the semester that a student is placed on Academic Probation, and any other semesters in Academic Probation, a student must participate in a special directive advising program to help the student address concerns that are impacting his/her academic performance, and to outline a plan for achieving academic success. This model of early intervention is designed to help students regroup and position themselves for academic success. Students on Academic Probation status during a term will automatically be dismissed at the end of that term if both:

  • the cumulative GPA is below a 2.0, and

  • the term GPA is below a 2.0.

  • For first-time, first-year, and transfer students, the summer term prior to their first fall term will not be included in the dismissal decision.

A student will no longer be on academic probation when his or her cumulative grade point average is 2.0 or higher and the term grade point average is 2.0 or higher. This policy is in place in recognition of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s minimum grade point average of 2.0 for graduation.

Academic Dismissal

Academic dismissal is the end result of a pattern of receiving grades that are below the university’s standards for good academic standing (GPA of 2.0 or better).

Students who have been academically dismissed are not eligible to enroll in classes, either full-time or part-time at the University of Tennessee (including correspondence and on-line courses). Academically dismissed students are not permitted to live in university housing and no longer have the privileges provided through the UT student identification card (VolCard). Academically dismissed students must remain away from the university for a mandatory absence and should use the period of dismissal to reflect on and address the factors that led to poor performance.

  • First Academic Dismissal
    A student dismissed for the first time may not be readmitted until after a full semester (not including summer) has elapsed.

  • Second Academic Dismissal
    A student dismissed for the second time may be readmitted after one calendar year has elapsed and after completing a minimum of 12 semester credits of academic course work with at least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average from accredited institution(s) of higher education. Students who have been dismissed twice are required to meet with the Undergraduate Council Appeals Committee. Students may be readmitted only when they present evidence that they are capable of performing at the level required to meet university academic standards and completing all degree requirements within a reasonable length of time.

  • Third Academic Dismissal
    After a third dismissal, a student is ineligible to attend the university and may not apply for readmission.

Students who have been academically dismissed and who are readmitted will be dismissed again if they fail to earn a 2.0 minimum term GPA at the end of the first semester after readmission and every term thereafter until the cumulative GPA reaches a 2.0.

For further information on readmission after academic dismissal, see Readmission to the University under the Admission to the University section of this catalog.

ACADEMIC SECOND OPPORTUNITY

Academic Second Opportunity is designed to assist the student who was not successful in progressing toward a degree during a previous attendance at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, but is now performing satisfactory work. Granting it is an acknowledgment by the university that the student’s earlier work is not consistent with his or her academic potential but that the work earned since return is. This policy is not intended to allow students to progress directly into a major. Exceptions to progression standards must be made at the college level.

An undergraduate student may petition for Academic Second Opportunity upon meeting the following requirements.

  • The student has re-enrolled following an absence from UT Knoxville of at least three full calendar years.

  • The student’s previous academic record at the university was unsatisfactory (normally, below a C average).

  • Since readmission, the student has completed 15 or more graded hours (correspondence course work may not be included in the 15 hours), earning a 2.5 GPA or above.

Decisions on granting Academic Second Opportunity are made by committee. If the student’s petition is approved, all previous academic work and grades will remain on the permanent record, but the grades for such work will not be used in computing the grade point average or in determining academic standing. Previous credits earned with a grade of C or better will continue to meet major, distribution, and graduation requirements.

To graduate, a student granted Academic Second Opportunity must complete at least 30 hours at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, following readmission. To meet minimum qualifications for graduation with honors, the student must earn at least 60 semester hours of letter grades (A-F) following readmission. Academic Second Opportunity may be granted only once. If hours earned during the previous attendance have already been applied toward the completion of an awarded degree from a four-year institution, Academic Second Opportunity will not be granted. Registration at another college or university since the previous UT Knoxville enrollment will not prevent a student from qualifying.

Petition must be made no later than the academic term prior to the one when the degree will be granted. Students should consult the Office of the University Registrar’s website (http://registrar.tennessee.edu/) for instructions and Academic Second Opportunity petition form. To initiate the petitioning process, students should meet with designated advisors in their colleges.

EXAMS

Proficiency Examination

A proficiency examination may be given in any academic course offered for undergraduate credit. University policy is to reserve to departments the decisions as to which courses, if any, can be passed by proficiency examinations. Proficiency examination credit is available only for the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, students.

When applying to a department for a proficiency examination, a student should present evidence of having developed the abilities, knowledge, and attitudes expected of those who have taken the course in question. The giving of the examination must be approved by the head of the department in which the course is offered. A fee must be paid in advance at the Bursar’s Office.

Subject to the grading policy of the college in which the student is enrolled, and except for courses which are graded only on as S/NC basis, a student who passes a proficiency examination and who wishes to have the grade recorded may choose to take the grade on the examination (A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+ or C) or take an S. An S gives credit for the course but does not affect the grade point average. If a grade of C-, D+, D, D- or F is made on a proficiency examination, the department is expected to note the attempt but no record of the examination is made on the student’s transcript. The maximum credits obtainable through proficiency examination and the use of proficiency examinations to remove failing grades (also the grade of I) are determined by the department offering the proficiency examination.

Entering international students whose native language is not English are required to take the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, English Proficiency Examination to determine placement in the appropriate English course. No credit for any English course is awarded through this special examination.

Final Exams

Final exams must be given during the final exam period at the scheduled time and in the scheduled place, although alternative uses of the scheduled exam period may be designated by the instructor. Examples would include group presentations, presentations of final projects or general discussions regarding course content.

Students are not required to take more than two exams on any day. The instructor(s) of the last non-departmental exam(s)1 on that day must reschedule the student’s exam during the final exam period. It is the obligation of students with such conflicts to make appropriate arrangements with the instructor at least two weeks prior to the end of classes.

In-class, written quizzes or tests counting more than 10% of the semester grade may not be given the last five calendar days before the study period. The study period, designated as “Study Day” on the Academic Calendar, is set aside for final examination study. There should be no assignments or projects due during this time.

No exams may be scheduled during the designated Study Period. No regular exams may be scheduled during the “Make Up Exam” times.

1 Some units offer departmental exams in which one, common exam period is assigned to all sections of a particular course. These exams should not be rescheduled.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR’S DEGREE

To receive a bachelor’s degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, a student must complete all of the requirements listed below.

  • Complete satisfactorily all requirements of the curriculum for which the student is enrolled, as described in the portion of this catalog devoted to the college or school offering the curriculum, and the University General Education Requirement , as described in the General Education section of this catalog. Curricular requirements change frequently and students should note the caution on the catalog home page. A student is allowed to satisfy requirements for a bachelor’s degree under any curriculum in effect during the student’s attendance at UT Knoxville provided the curriculum has been in effect within six years of the date of graduation. This does not obligate the university to offer a discontinued course. Programs may be adjusted by the student’s faculty advisor and college dean in consultation with the Office of the University Registrar.

  • Achieve a grade point average of at least 2.0 on all work attempted at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Incompletes and Not Reported grades must have a letter grade prior to graduation.

  • Complete 60 hours of credit offered for the bachelor’s degree at an accredited senior college.

  • Complete the last 30 hours of credit offered for the bachelor’s degree in residence at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. During the final 30 hours, up to two courses outside a student’s major may be taken at another institution as long as the student has 25% of coursework for the degree completed at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Special arrangements to allow study abroad courses, work taken at other University of Tennessee campuses, and all other requests for waiving this requirement must be approved by the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled.

  • Comply with the state law that one unit of American history at the high school level or 6 semester hours of collegiate work be satisfactorily completed. This requirement is effective for those graduating July 1, 1978, and thereafter. It may be satisfied by completing HIST 221 -HIST 222  (or HIST 227 -HIST 228 ). Students should consult the catalog of enrollment to determine how the six hour’s credit for fulfillment of this requirement is to be included in individual curricula.

  • Comply with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools requirement that students complete 25 percent of the credit hours required for the bachelor’s degree at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

  • Satisfy all financial obligations (fees or fines) owed to the university.

  • File an application for a degree with the Office of the University Registrar. Application deadlines for each term are on the web. (http:/registrar.tennessee.edu/).To apply for graduation, go to the MyUTK portal under the self-service section.

  • Comply with the Tennessee Higher Education Commission requirements (Senior General Education Test and Senior Major Field Assessment Test).

Some colleges within the university have special requirements above and beyond those stated here. Students are advised to consult the appropriate section of this catalog for any further degree requirements. Each program presented by the candidate for a bachelor’s degree is reviewed and approved for meeting the degree requirements by the Office of the University Registrar. Grades cannot be changed for courses within a degree that has been awarded.

Students who wish to participate in their graduating class commencement ceremony will need to place a cap and gown order with the University Center Book and Supply Store. Orders placed after the deadline date established by the Book and Supply Store will be subject to a late fee.

A student's name and the degree awarded are included on the diploma. Majors, concentrations and minors only appear on a student's academic transcript.

Multiple Concentrations

Multiple concentration listings may appear on a student’s transcript when a minimum of 12 distinct credit hours differentiates one concentration from another. Once a bachelor’s degree has been awarded, students may not add a different area of concentration.

Second Majors

Students may pursue any available second majors. Second majors will be noted on students’ transcripts upon graduation. Meeting the requirements of second majors may lengthen students’ academic programs. Once a bachelor’s degree has been awarded, students may not add a second major to that degree.

Minors

Minors are available in most departments or programs in which majors are offered. Requirements for specific minors vary by program and are discussed under each department or program. Courses taken to satisfy major requirements or the university’s general education requirements may, when appropriate, be used for the minor. Students must satisfy requirements for a minor under the same catalog used for the major. Minors will be noted on students’ transcripts upon graduation. Meeting the requirements of minors may lengthen students’ academic programs. Once a bachelor’s degree has been awarded, students may not add a minor to that degree.

Second Bachelor’s Degree

Guidelines

A student holding a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher learning may receive a second bachelor’s degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, by satisfying the following.

  • Meet all requirements of both degrees.
  • Complete at least 30 semester hours in addition to the total hours required for the first bachelor’s degree.
  • Declare the intention to work for a second bachelor’s degree with the academic advisor.

Students are able to enroll in additional post-baccalaureate coursework in lieu of pursuing a second baccalaureate degree. Students are further encouraged to pursue graduate studies toward an advanced degree. Once a bachelor’s degree has been awarded, a student may not add a second bachelor’s degree in the same major as the first bachelor’s degree even if the student wants to pursue a different concentration in that major. A student may not receive a second bachelor’s degree in a major that has already been awarded as a minor in a first bachelor’s degree.

General Education Requirements

A student holding a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher learning who enrolls at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, intending to work toward a second bachelor’s degree will be considered to have fulfilled the general education requirement established by the faculty at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Students should be aware that many majors require completion of an intermediate level sequence of a foreign language, and some majors require more stringent math and science requirements than may have been required by their previous institution. Students should review the detailed transfer information on majors/degrees for the specific requirements of their prospective UT major at: http://registrar.tennessee.edu/transfer/.

Honors Categories for Graduation

Honors are conferred upon graduating undergraduate students who have displayed a high level of achievement during their university career.

Recipients of honors receive their degrees with

   • cum laude

3.5 through 3.64.

   • magna cum laude

3.65 through 3.79.

   • summa cum laude

3.8 through 4.0.

These honors categories are based on a student’s cumulative average at the end of the semester preceding the graduation semester. Students must have earned at least 60 hours at UT Knoxville in order to qualify for honors categories.

If, at graduation, a student’s grade point average would allow a higher honors category than that determined at the end of the semester preceding the graduation semester, the student will receive a substitute diploma indicating the higher category.

Chancellor’s Honors are conferred upon graduating students who have completed the Chancellor’s Honors Program.