2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Dec 16, 2018  
2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

General Education


 

Introduction
For Building Basic Skills
      –Communicating through Writing
      –Communicating Orally
      –Quantitative Reasoning
 

For Developing Broadened Perspectives
      –Natural Sciences
      –Arts and Humanities
      –Social Sciences
      –Cultures and Civilizations


2009-2010 University General Education Requirement

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Statement of Purpose. General education provides the foundation for successful academic study, for lifelong learning, and for carrying out the duties of local, national, and global citizenship. By building basic skills in communication, analysis, and computation as well as by broadening students’ historical and cultural perspectives, the general education curriculum helps students acquire an understanding of both self and society, and thus contributes to their personal enrichment while enrolled and after graduation.

The University of Tennessee’s general education program has been designed to enable the student to move among colleges within the university or to move to another institution of higher learning. Although it will provide the students with the skills required by college study, those skills are specific neither to UT Knoxville nor to a particular major or career path.

Outcomes. The program is expected to produce the following outcomes for the students.

Building Basic Skills. Because the hallmark of the educated person is the ability to think independently, students must be trained to acquire, evaluate, and use information.

  • Students must be able to acquire information by conducting independent research, both in a conventional library setting and through the use of the rapidly developing electronic technologies, including databases and internet resources.
  • Students must then learn to evaluate the reliability, accuracy, and logical soundness of that information. The students will be taught to apply evaluative techniques to statistical and rhetorical presentations in arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.
  • Students must be trained to use the information that they have acquired. They must write clearly, speak convincingly, and solve problems using creative approaches.

Developing Broadened Perspectives. General education should help students develop habits of self-examination in the context of the individual’s relationship to family, community, society, and world. To this end, general education should also help foster a commitment to respecting the diversity of personal and cultural values.

  • Students should be able to explain their own values and beliefs, as well as to understand the histories and cultures behind those values. Students should also develop a commitment to lifelong learning so that they may continue to examine the relationships between their personal perspectives and the perspectives that arise from other cultures.
  • Students should strengthen their sensitivity to cultural diversity by studying the histories and traditions of other cultures, both within and outside the United States; and by understanding the dynamic nature of a multicultural world through interdisciplinary perspectives or by learning other languages.

These are the General Education requirements (See Notes).


 A. For Building Basic Skills   

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 I. Communicating through Writing (3 courses including English 101 and 102 plus an approved writing-intensive course).


Good writing skills enable students to create and share ideas, investigate and describe values, and record discoveries – all skills that are necessary not only for professional success but also for personal fulfillment in a world where communication increasingly takes place through electronic media. Students must be able to identify areas for inquiry, locate relevant information, evaluate its usefulness and quality, and incorporate the information logically and ethically. They must be able to write correctly, and they must be aware that different audiences and purposes call for different rhetorical responses.

To satisfy this requirement, students take the first-year composition sequence, which may be met in one of two ways:

 
  • By completing 6 hours in English writing courses – either ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 ; or ENGL 118  and ENGL 102 ; or ENGL 131  and ENGL 132 . Eligibility for ENGL 118  will be determined by ACT or SAT scores. Students who obtain a grade of A or B in 118 may complete their first-year composition requirement with ENGL 102 , or with a sophomore-level course in the English department, or ENGL 355 . The sophomore course, if designated AH, may also be used toward the Arts and Humanities General Education requirement.
  • By earning a score of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Test in Literature and Composition. Credit in ENGL 101  is earned with a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Test in Language and Composition.

Upon completion of ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or their equivalent, students must take one other course designated as “writing-intensive” (WC) in the undergraduate catalog. The writing-intensive courses can be within the student’s major or an elective. In order to gain a (WC) designation, courses shall require formal and informal writing assignments that total 5,000 words.

Approved Communicating Through Writing (WC) Courses

Agricultural and Extension Education
      AGEE 440 - Communication Techniques in Agriculture 

Anthropology
      ANTH 210 - Principles of Biological Anthropology 

Animal Science
      ANSC 280 - Biotechnology and Management Practices in Animal Production   

Architecture
      ARCH 213 - Modern Architecture: Histories And Theories 

Art History
      AHIS 402 - Seminar in Art History II 

Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology
      BCMB 409 - Perspectives in Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology 

Chemical Engineering
      CBE 310 - Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory 

Chemistry
      CHEM 479 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I   

Child and Family Studies
      CFS 405 - Development of Professional Skills   

Civil Engineering
      CE 205 - Professional Development I   

Electrical and Computer Engineering
      ECE 400 - Senior Design 

English
      ENGL 206 - Introduction to Shakespeare 
      ENGL 254 - Themes in Literature 
      ENGL 255 - Public Writing 
      ENGL 257 - Honors: Public Writing 
      ENGL 295 - Business and Technical Writing 
      ENGL 355 - Rhetoric and Writing 
      ENGL 357 - Honors: Rhetoric and Writing 
      ENGL 360 - Technical and Professional Writing 
      ENGL 363 - Writing Poetry 
      ENGL 364 - Writing Fiction 
      ENGL 367 - Honors: Writing Poetry 
      ENGL 368 - Honors: Writing Fiction 
      ENGL 398 - Junior-Senior Honors Seminar 
      ENGL 455 - Persuasive Writing 
      ENGL 497 - Honors: Senior Seminar 
      ENGL 499 - Senior Seminar   

Forestry
      FORS 321 - Wildland Recreation 
      FORS 327 - Honors: Wildland Recreation   

Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries
      FWF 312 - Principles of Silviculture   

Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism
      HRT 390 - Professional Development  (same as Retail and Consumer Sciences 390)  

Industrial Engineering
      IE 350 - Junior Cooperative Learning Experience   

Information Sciences
      INSC 450 - Writing About Science and Medicine  (same as Journalism and Electronic Media 450)  

Journalism and Electronic Media
      JREM 200 - Introduction to News Writing 
      JREM 201 - Writing for Mass Media 
      JREM 414 - Magazine and Feature Writing 
      JREM 444 - Journalism as Literature 
      JREM 450 - Writing about Science and Medicine 
      JREM 451 - Environmental Writing 
      JREM 456 - Science Writing as Literature   

Judaic Studies
      JST 322 - Medieval Philosophy  (same as Medieval Studies 322 and Philosophy 322)

Materials Science and Engineering
      MSE 405 - Structural Characterization of Materials   

Medieval Studies
      MDST 322 - Medieval Philosophy  (same as Judaic Studies 322 and Philosophy 322)

Music Education
      MUED 430 - Music Methods for High School   

Musicology
      MUCO 210 - History of Western Music, Ancient to the Baroque 
      MUCO 330 - Women in Music  (same as Women’s Studies 330)
      MUCO 380 - Music in World Cultures   

Nuclear Engineering
      NE 401 - Radiological Engineering Laboratory 
      NE 402 - Nuclear Engineering Laboratory   

Nursing
      NURS 403 - Health Promotion and Maintenance in Childbearing Families 
      NURS 494 - Alternative Preceptorship 

Nutrition
      NUTR 412 - Food and Nutrition in the Community   

Philosophy
      PHIL 241 - Engineering Ethics 
      PHIL 243 - Business Ethics 
      PHIL 246 - Bioethics 
      PHIL 290 - Social and Political Philosophy 
      PHIL 320 - Ancient Western Philosophy 
      PHIL 322 - Medieval Philosophy  (same as Medieval Studies 322 and Judaic Studies 322)
      PHIL 324 - 17th- and 18th-Century Philosophy 
      PHIL 326 - 19th- and 20th-Century Philosophy 

Plant Sciences
      PLSC 410 - Nursery Management and Production 
      PLSC 448 - Horticultural Internet Communication   

Retail and Consumer Sciences
      RCS 390 - Professional Development  (same as Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism 390) 

Russian
      RUSS 221 - Rebels, Dreamers, and Fools: The Outcast in 19th Century Russian Literature   

Social Work
      SOWK 314 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment 
      SOWK 317 - Honors: Human Behavior in the Social Environment   

Sociology
      SOCI 260 - Introduction to the Study of Environmental Issues 

Theatre
      THEA 300 - Play Analysis   

Women’s Studies
      WOST 330 - Women in Music  (same as Musicology 330)
      WOST 382 - Philosophy of Feminism  (same as Philosophy 382)

II. Communicating Orally (1 course)

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The ability to communicate one’s ideas orally is as important as the ability to express them well in writing. Students should be able to speak in an informative and/or convincing manner to other individuals and to groups, both small and large. Being able to express one’s thoughts clearly has always been a critical component of good citizenship. Students should be able to locate relevant information, evaluate its usefulness and quality, and incorporate the information logically and ethically in public address. (See Note 5.) This requirement may be completed by

 
  1. completion of Communication Studies 210  or Communication Studies 240  (or honors equivalents: CMST 217  or CMST 247 )
    or
  2. completion of a course with an (OC) designation.

Approved Communicating Orally (OC) Courses

Aerospace Engineering
      AE 410 - Professional Topics   

Animal Science
      ANSC 360 - Horse, Dairy, and Meat Animal Evaluation 

Art Design/Graphic
      ADES 452 - Graphic Design Seminar 

Biology
      BIOL 157 - Honors Experimental Biology   

Biomedical Engineering
      BME 410 - Professional Topics 

Biosystems Engineering
      BSE 401 - Biosystems Engineering Design I 

Chemistry
      CHEM 406 - Senior Seminar   

Child and Family Studies
      CFS 405 - Development of Professional Skills   

Civil Engineering
      CE 205 - Professional Development I   

Electrical and Computer Engineering
      ECE 400 - Senior Design 

Environmental and Soil Sciences
      ESS 301 - Professional Development 

Materials Science and Engineering
      MSE 489 - Materials Design 

Mechanical Engineering
      ME 410 - Professional Topics 

Nuclear Engineering
      NE 400 - Senior Seminar 

Nursing
      NURS 341 - Transcultural Nursing 
      NURS 454 - Professional Leadership Issues 

Philosophy
      PHIL 242 - Contemporary Moral Issues 
      PHIL 244 - Professional Responsibility  (same as Religious Studies 244)

Religious Studies
      REST 244 - Professional Responsibility  (same as Philosophy 244)

III. Quantitative Reasoning (2 courses)

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In today’s world, arguments and claims often rely for support on scientific studies and statistical evidence. Students should possess the mathematical and quantitative skills to evaluate such evidence. Furthermore, students should possess the skills both to recognize the quantitative dimension of problems and to use mathematical reasoning to formulate and solve the problem. Finally, students need strong quantitative skills because they are indispensable in managing everyday-life situations. This requirement may be completed by either of the following.

 
  1. Taking two mathematics or statistics courses from the list below. (Preferably, these courses would be taken in one of the following pairings: MATH 113  and MATH 115 ; MATH 123  and MATH 125 ; MATH 141  and MATH 142 ; MATH 147  and MATH 148 ; MATH 151  and MATH 152 ; MATH 125 , MATH 141  or MATH 147  and STAT 201  or STAT 207 ; MATH 115  and MATH 123  or MATH 125  or MATH 202 .).
    or
  2. Taking one mathematics course from the list below and one course designated in the undergraduate catalog as having a quantitative component (QR). The course designated as having a quantitative component may be within the student’s major or an elective.

Mathematics
      MATH 113 - Mathematical Reasoning 
      MATH 115 - Statistical Reasoning 
      MATH 117 - Honors: Mathematical Reasoning 
      MATH 123 - Finite Mathematics 
      MATH 125 - Basic Calculus 
      MATH 141 - Calculus I 
      MATH 142 - Calculus II 
      MATH 147 - Honors: Calculus I 
      MATH 148 - Honors: Calculus II 
      MATH 151 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences I 
      MATH 152 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences II 
      MATH 202 - Probability, Statistics, and Euclidean Geometry 

Statistics
      STAT 201 - Introduction to Statistics 
      STAT 207 - Honors: Introduction to Statistics 

Approved Quantitative Reasoning (QR) Courses


Architecture
      ARCH 331 - Architectural Structures I   

Computer Science
      COSC 100 - Introduction to Computers and Computing 
      COSC 102 - Introduction to Computer Science 

Interior Design
      IDS 460 - Lighting for Interior Design   

Music Technology
      MUTC 290 - Sound Recording Techniques   

B. For Developing Broadened Perspectives

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I. Natural Sciences (2 courses)


As science and technology come to play an increasingly important role in contemporary life, it is essential for all educated persons to have a fundamental understanding of science and its methods. All students should be familiar with one or more scientific disciplines and the role of science in contemporary society. Such familiarity may be gained through acquisition of knowledge of a discipline’s basic vocabulary, chief discoveries, and fundamental principles; exposure to a discipline’s experimental techniques; and the ability to analyze issues with scientific dimensions. This requirement is satisfied by taking two courses from the approved list. At least one of the courses must have a laboratory.

Approved Natural Sciences (NS) Courses († Non-Lab Courses)

Anthropology
      ANTH 110 - Human Origins 
      ANTH 117 - Honors: Human Origins  † 

Astronomy
      ASTR 151 - A Journey through the Solar System 
      ASTR 152 - Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology 
      ASTR 161 - A Journey through the Solar System with Laboratory 
      ASTR 162 - Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology with Laboratory 
      ASTR 217 - Honors: Introductory Astronomy 
      ASTR 218 - Honors: Introductory Astronomy 

Biology
      BIOL 101 - Humankind in the Biotic World 
      BIOL 102 - Humankind in the Biotic World 
      BIOL 111 - General Botany 
      BIOL 112 - General Botany 
      BIOL 130 - Biodiversity 
      BIOL 140 - Organization and Function of the Cell 
      BIOL 157 - Honors Experimental Biology   

Chemistry
      CHEM 100 - Principles of Chemistry 
      CHEM 110 - Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 
      CHEM 120 - General Chemistry I 
      CHEM 130 - General Chemistry II 
      CHEM 128 - Honors: General Chemistry I 
      CHEM 138 - Honors: General Chemistry II 

Engineering Fundamentals
      EF 151 - Physics for Engineers I 
      EF 152 - Physics for Engineers II 
      EF 157 - Honors: Physics for Engineers I 
      EF 158 - Honors: Physics for Engineers II 

Entomology and Plant Pathology
      EPP 201 - Impact of Insects and Plant Diseases on Human Societies 

Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries
      FWF 250 - Conservation 

Geography
      GEOG 131 - Geography of the Natural Environment I 
      GEOG 132 - Geography of the Natural Environment II 

Geology
      GEOL 101 - The Dynamic Earth 
      GEOL 102 - Earth, Life, and Time 
      GEOL 103 - The Earth’s Environments 
      GEOL 107 - Honors: The Dynamic Earth 
      GEOL 108 - Honors: Earth, Life, and Time 
      GEOL 201 - Biodiversity: Past, Present, and Future 
      GEOL 202 - Earth as an Ecosystem: Modern Problems and Solutions 
      GEOL 203 - Geology of National Parks 
      GEOL 205 - Age of the Dinosaurs 
      GEOL 207 - Honors: Age of the Dinosaurs 
      GEOL 208 - Honors: Earth as an Ecosystem: Modern Problems and Solutions 

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 288 - Energy in the Modern World 

Microbiology
      MICR 210 - General Microbiology 

Nutrition
      NUTR 100 - Introductory Nutrition 

Physics
      PHYS 101 - How Things Work I 
      PHYS 102 - How Things Work II 
      PHYS 135 - Introduction to Physics for Physical Science and Mathematics Majors I 
      PHYS 136 - Introduction to Physics for Physical Science and Mathematics Majors II 
      PHYS 137 - Honors: Fundamentals of Physics for Physics Majors I 
      PHYS 138 - Honors: Fundamentals of Physics for Physics Majors II 
      PHYS 161 - Elements of Physics for Architects and Interior Design Students 
      PHYS 221 - Elements of Physics 
      PHYS 222 - Elements of Physics 
      PHYS 231 - Fundamentals of Physics: Electricity and Magnetism 
      PHYS 232 - Fundamentals of Physics: Wave Motion, Optics, and Modern Physics 

II. Arts and Humanities (2 courses)  

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To live well in the present, one must have an acquaintance with the past, especially with the cultural achievements that are the distinctive hallmarks of all human societies. An appreciation of art, music, theater, literature, and philosophy will not only enrich the lives of students, but it will also help them understand their own and other’s aspirations, both in a historical and a contemporary context. This requirement is satisfied by taking two courses from the list below.

Approved Arts and Humanities (AH) Courses

Africana Studies
      AFST 162 - Art of Africa, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian America  (same as Art History 162)
      AFST 225 - Introduction to African Literature  (same as English 225)
      AFST 226 - Introduction to Caribbean Literature  (same as English 226)  
      AFST 233 - Major Black Writers  (same as English 233)

Architecture
      ARCH 111 - Architecture and the Built Environment 
      ARCH 117 - Honors: Architecture and the Built Environment 
      ARCH 211 - History and Theory of Architecture I 
      ARCH 212 - History and Theory of Architecture II 
      ARCH 217 - Honors: History and Theory of Architecture I 
      ARCH 218 - Honors: History and Theory of Architecture II 

Art History
      AHIS 162 - Art of Africa, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian America  (same as Africana Studies 162)
      AHIS 167 - Honors: Art of Africa, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian America 
      AHIS 172 - Western Art I 
      AHIS 173 - Western Art II 
      AHIS 177 - Honors: Western Art I 
      AHIS 178 - Honors: Western Art II 
      AHIS 183 - Asian Art 
      AHIS 187 - Honors: Asian Art 

Classics
      CLAS 221 - Early Greek Mythology 
      CLAS 222 - Classical Greek and Roman Mythology 
      CLAS 232 - Archaeology and Art of Ancient Greece and Rome 
      CLAS 253 - Greek and Roman Literature in English Translation   

English
      ENGL 201 - British Literature I: Beowulf through Johnson 
      ENGL 202 - British Literature II: Wordsworth to the Present 
      ENGL 206 - Introduction to Shakespeare 
      ENGL 207 - Honors: British Literature I 
      ENGL 208 - Honors: British Literature II 
      ENGL 221 - World Literature I: Ancient through Early Modern 
      ENGL 222 - World Literature II: The Eighteenth-Century to the Present 
      ENGL 225 - Introduction to African Literature  (same as Africana Studies 225)
      ENGL 226 - Introduction to Caribbean Literature  (Same as Africana Studies 226)
      ENGL 231 - American Literature I: Colonial Era to the Civil War 
      ENGL 232 - American Literature II: Civil War to the Present 
      ENGL 233 - Major Black Writers  (same as Africana Studies 233)
      ENGL 237 - Honors: American Literature I: Colonial Era to the Civil War 
      ENGL 238 - Honors: American Literature II: Civil War to the Present 
      ENGL 251 - Introduction to Poetry 
      ENGL 252 - Introduction to Drama 
      ENGL 253 - Introduction to Fiction 
      ENGL 254 - Themes in Literature 

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 258 - Foundations of Modernity 

Musicology
      MUCO 110 - Introduction to Music in Western Culture 
      MUCO 115 - Music in the United States 
      MUCO 120 - History of Rock 
      MUCO 125 - Jazz in American Culture 
      MUCO 210 - History of Western Music, Ancient to the Baroque 
      MUCO 220 - History of Western Music, Classical to the Present 
      MUCO 290 - Soundscapes: Exploring Music in a Changing World 

Philosophy
      PHIL 110 - The Human Condition: Values and Reality 
      PHIL 111 - The Human Condition: Knowledge and Reality 
      PHIL 117 - Honors: Introduction to Philosophy I 
      PHIL 118 - Honors: Introduction to Philosophy II 
      PHIL 241 - Engineering Ethics 
      PHIL 242 - Contemporary Moral Issues 
      PHIL 243 - Business Ethics 
      PHIL 244 - Professional Responsibility  (same as Religious Studies 244)
      PHIL 245 - Environmental Ethics 
      PHIL 246 - Bioethics 
      PHIL 290 - Social and Political Philosophy 

Religious Studies
      REST 244 - Professional Responsibility  (same as Philosophy 244)

Russian
      RUSS 221 - Rebels, Dreamers, and Fools: The Outcast in 19th Century Russian Literature 
      RUSS 222 - Heaven or Hell: Utopias and Dystopias in 20th-Century Russian Literature 

Theatre
      THEA 100 - Introduction to Theatre 

University Honors
      UNHO 257 - Special Topics in the Arts and Humanities 

III. Social Sciences (2 courses)   

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The goal of the social sciences is to help us understand the way that we live, especially the relation between the individual and the group, sometimes from an historical but often from a contemporary perspective. Vital to the continued health and success of our society is an understanding of the complex individual, political, and social dynamics that make up the modern world. Students should not only have knowledge of the principal concerns of the social sciences, but they should also understand the methods by which social scientists collect and evaluate knowledge. This requirement is satisfied by taking two courses from the following list.

Approved Social Sciences (SS) Courses

Africana Studies
      AFST 201 - Introduction to African-American Studies 
      AFST 202 - Introduction to African-American Studies 

Agricultural Economics
      AGEC 201 - Economics of the Global Food and Fiber System 

Anthropology
      ANTH 130 - Cultural Anthropology 
      ANTH 130 - Cultural Anthropology 

Child and Family Studies
      CFS 210 - Human Development 
      CFS 220 - Marriage and Family: Roles and Relationships  (same as Women’s Studies 230)

Economics
      ECON 201 - Introductory Economics: A Survey Course 
      ECON 207 - Honors: Introductory Economics 

Geography
      GEOG 101 - World Geography 
      GEOG 102 - World Geography 

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 268 - Perspectives on Globalization 

Political Science
      POLS 102 - Introduction to Political Science 

Psychology
      PSYC 110 - General Psychology 
      PSYC 117 - Honors: General Psychology 

Sociology
      SOCI 110 - Social Justice and Social Change 
      SOCI 117 - Honors: Social Justice and Social Change 
      SOCI 120 - General Sociology 
      SOCI 127 - Honors: General Sociology 

University Honors
      UNHO 267 - Special Topics in the Social Sciences 

Women’s Studies
      WOST 230 - Marriage and Family: Roles and Relationships  (same as Child and Family Studies 220)

IV. Cultures and Civilizations (2 courses)

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Knowledge of foreign languages and cultures and their histories have long been required of educated people. Today technologies of travel and communication create global communities, and so increase the importance of this knowledge. While it is not possible to become expert in all cultures and civilizations, a perspective on which to build knowledge over a lifetime can be gained by study of foreign languages and the study of the cultures and histories of their speakers. This perspective improves the ability of students to function effectively in the global community of the twenty-first century by developing an appreciation of linguistic, historical, and cultural diversity. This requirement is satisfied by either

(1) taking two courses from the following list
or
(2) taking a two-course sequence in a foreign language at the intermediate level.
or
(3) taking a six-hour intensive foreign language course at the intermediate level.

Approved Cultures and Civilizations (CC) Courses

Africana Studies
      AFST 235 - Introduction to African Studies 
      AFST 236 - Introduction to African Studies 

Anthropology
      ANTH 120 - Prehistoric Archaeology 
      ANTH 127 - Honors: Prehistoric Archaeology 

Classics
      CLAS 201 - Introduction to Classical Civilization 

Environmental and Soil Sciences
      ESS 120 - Soils and Civilizations 
      ESS 220 - Waters and Civilizations 

Global Studies
      GLBS 250 - Introduction to Global Studies 

History
      HIST 241 - Development of Western Civilization 
      HIST 242 - Development of Western Civilization 
      HIST 247 - Honors: Development of Western Civilization 
      HIST 248 - Honors: Development of Western Civilization 
      HIST 255 - Introduction to Latin American Studies 
      HIST 256 - Introduction to Latin American Studies 
      HIST 261 - A History of World Civilization 
      HIST 262 - A History of World Civilization 
      HIST 267 - Honors: A History of World Civilization 
      HIST 268 - Honors: A History of World Civilization 

Latin American Studies
      LAMS 251 - Introduction to Latin American Studies 
      LAMS 252 - Introduction to Latin American Studies 

Medieval Studies
      MDST 201 - Medieval Civilization 
      MDST 202 - Medieval Civilization 

Religious Studies
      REST 101 - World Religions in History 
      REST 102 - The Comparison of World Religions 
      REST 107 - Honors: World Religions in History 

Sociology
      SOCI 250 - Introduction to Global Studies 

University Honors
      UNHO 277 - Special Topics in Cultures and Civilizations 

INTERMEDIATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE SEQUENCES

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Arabic
      ARAB 221 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I 
      ARAB 222 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II 

Asian Languages
      ASLN 231 - Intermediate Chinese I 
      ASLN 232 - Intermediate Chinese II 
      ASLN 251 - Intermediate Japanese I 
      ASLN 252 - Intermediate Japanese II 

Asian Studies
      ASST 221 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I 
      ASST 222 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II 
      ASST 241 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew I 
      ASST 242 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew II 
      ASST 261 - Intermediate Persian I 
      ASST 262 - Intermediate Persian II 

Chinese
      CHIN 231 - Intermediate Chinese I 
      CHIN 232 - Intermediate Chinese II 

Classics
      CLAS 251 - Intermediate Latin I 
      CLAS 252 - Intermediate Latin II 
      CLAS 261 - Intermediate Greek: Grammar Review and Readings 
      CLAS 264 - Intermediate Greek: Epic Poetry 

French
      FREN 211 - Intermediate French I 
      FREN 212 - Intermediate French II 
      FREN 217 - Honors: Intermediate French I 
      FREN 218 - Honors: Intermediate French II 

German
      GERM 201 - Intermediate German I 
      GERM 202 - Intermediate German II 

Hebrew
      HEBR 241 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew I 
      HEBR 242 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew II 

Italian
      ITAL 211 - Intermediate Italian 
      ITAL 212 - Intermediate Italian 

Japanese
      JAPA 251 - Intermediate Japanese I 
      JAPA 252 - Intermediate Japanese II 

Persian
      PERS 261 - Intermediate Persian I 
      PERS 262 - Intermediate Persian II 

Portuguese
      PORT 211 - Intermediate Portuguese 
      PORT 212 - Intermediate Portuguese 

Russian
      RUSS 201 - Intermediate Russian 
      RUSS 202 - Intermediate Russian 

Spanish
      SPAN 211 - Intermediate Spanish 
      SPAN 212 - Intermediate Spanish 
      SPAN 217 - Honors: Intermediate Spanish 
      SPAN 218 - Honors: Intermediate Spanish 

INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES

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French
      FREN 223 - Intensive Intermediate French 

German
      GERM 223 - Intensive Intermediate German 

Italian
      ITAL 223 - Intensive Intermediate Italian 

Portuguese
      PORT 223 - Intensive Intermediate Portuguese 

Spanish
      SPAN 223 - Intensive Intermediate Spanish 

Notes


  1. Some courses on the various General Education course lists may have prerequisites. Students are responsible for meeting all course prerequisites.
  2. A student’s college/program may require specific General Education courses.
  3. General Education courses must be taken for a letter grade (i.e., AF) rather than Satisfactory/No Credit (unless this is the only way the course is offered).
  4. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) is committed to providing equal opportunities for students with disabilities at the University of Tennessee. Appropriate accommodations will be made to enable persons with disabilities to satisfy the General Education requirements. Students with documented disabilities should contact the Office of Disability Services for assistance with appropriate accommodations at (865) 974-6087 or ods@tennessee.edu.
  5. Subcommittees of the Undergraduate Council General Education Committee are charged with management of the courses to be included on the General Education course lists for the Basic Skills and Broadened Perspectives areas. The most current list of General Education courses is posted at http://web.utk.edu/~ugcouncl.